Clarence Davis Sr

  • Clarence Davis Sr St. Louis COVID-19 veteran death
  • St. Louis WWII COVID-19 veteran death, Clarence Davis Sr.

Clarence Davis Sr., a World War II veteran, died from complications of COVID-19 at St. Louis University Hospital on November 20, 2020 at the age of 97.

During World War II, Clarence served in the U.S. Navy, achieving the rank of Carpenters Mate Second Class; he was among the first Black enlisted men to attain this designation. He was also a Freemason, a Boy Scout Leader, and an active member of the VFW. After WWII, Clarence worked a variety of jobs before retiring from the Records Management Department at Monsanto. He always loved carpentry, and was known and respected for his skill across St. Louis City and County. Clarence also loved gardening (especially roses), watching baseball, bowling, and keeping active with church activities (St. Johns Church). He was a devoted husband and father, and contributed to the development of countless children and teenagers in the community.

Clarence Davis Sr. is missed deeply by his wife, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, great-great-grandchildren, extended family, church family, and those in the St. Louis community fortunate enough to know him.

Sources:

Clarence Davis Sr. obituary at Chapel Hill Funeral Home, Kirkwood MO 

Donald E. Lavin

WWII Veteran Don Lavin COVID-19 death

Donald “Don” Lavin died of COVID-19 on December 21, 2020 at the age of 94.

Don was raised in North St. Louis and served in the Navy on the USS Borie at the end of World War II. After being honorably discharged, Don completed his studies at St. Louis University and married the love of his life. They raised three children and grew stronger together after the tragic death of their youngest child to heart disease. While Don prioritized his family and faith, his accomplished career in the automotive industry spanned more than forty years, the last thirty-two of which he spent at Chrysler. He was known for his limitless capacity for kindness, his laughter, his epic story telling, fierce poker playing, and driving tennis opponents to insanity with his notorious lob. He was devastated when his wife passed in 2015 after 64 years of marriage.

Donald’s obituary states: “Don was 94 years old when he contracted Covid and passed on less than one week later. Despite that hospital restrictions prevented his family from visiting his bedside, his dedicated nurses, Chuck and Lexi, arranged Zoom calls that allowed his family to bid their final farewells. His memory as an unparalleled role model looms large among his relatives who miss him dearly. They wish to offer a special thanks to Dr. James Hollis, the staff at the Covid Unit at Mercy Hospital and the loving caretakers at The Glen at Aberdeen, especially Don’s “personal trainer” Maria.”

Don is missed deeply by his two surviving adult children, his grandkids, extended family and many friends.

Sources:


Donald Lavin obituary at Buckholz Mortuary
 

Joseph C. Budde

WWII veteran Joseph C. Budde died of COVID-19 on December 9, 2020 at the age of 96.

WWII veteran Joseph C. Budde died of COVID-19 on December 9, 2020 at the age of 96.

Joseph served in the Army Air Corps in WWII flying 35 missions in Europe, including the days leading up to D-Day, followed by another 60 missions in Asia. After the war, he got a degree in electrical engineering from St. Louis University and worked at Sverdrup and Parcel Engineers and Architects for the next 35 years while he and his wife raised their two children. Joseph and his late wife were longtime parishioners at Our Lady of Providence in Crestwood.

Joseph C. Budde is missed deeply by his children, grandchildren, extended family, friends, and everyone who was fortunate to know him.

Sources:


Joseph C. Budde obituary at Kutis Funeral Homes
 

Elizabeth Quinn

Elizabeth Quinn, a WWII military veteran from England who emigrated as a war bride and made St. Louis her home, died of complications from COVID-19 on November 13, 2020 at the age of 94.

According to her obituary, “During WWII, she joined the Women’s Royal Naval Service in 1943 at age 18, serving at Bletchley Park with the codebreakers (without divulging that work to anyone including her family until secrecy was lifted in the 1970’s).” She met her “Yank soldier” John at a dance during the war, married in 1945, and soon after landing in St. Louis she became a U.S. Citizen. They traveled the USA together, and had lots of adventures over their 63 years together.

Elizabeth had a lifelong love of reading, serving as librarian on the first St. Louis County bookmobile in 1948-49 after the birth of her son, and working as a librarian for 35 more years until she retired. In her later years Elizabeth was still an avid reader and used the library’s mobile services, coming very full circle when her photo was placed on the side of a new St. Louis County bookmobile.

She was laid to rest in a private ceremony next to her late husband at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Elizabeth Quinn is missed deeply by her large and diverse extended family, her many friends, and all those who she helped spark the joy of reading in.

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Cheldron “Marty” Fox

Cheldron “Marty” Fox, a WWII Army Veteran who participated in Day 3 of the Normandy Invasion, died from COVID-19 on June 20, 2020 at the age of 100. He’d enjoyed swing dancing, golf, and kept active well into his 90s. He was loved for his quick smile and kind heart.

Cheldron Fox is missed deeply by his surviving adult children, grand children, great grandchildren, great-great grandchildren, and his extended family and friends.

Sources:

Cheldron “Marty” Fox obituary at Dignity Memorial 

James “Chick” Henry Rufkahr

James Henry Rufkahr WWII veteran COVID-19 death St. Charles MO

James Rufkahr, a WWII veteran, died on June 1, 2020 from COVID-19 at the age of 94 in St. Charles. He grew up on a farm in rural Wright City during the Great Depression. After serving our country in the US Army in World War II, James worked at Ford Motor Company in Hazelwood for 30 years while he raised his family.

After retiring, James worked as a bus drive and handyman for another 17 years. He volunteered with his church, Sts. John and James in Ferguson, and delivered for Meals on Wheels. James was always athletic, participating in the Senior Olympics and ballroom dancing with his wife. He’s remembered for his big friendly smile and giving nature.

James “Chick” Rufkahr is missed by his two daughters, great grandsons, large extended family, church family, and all those who knew and loved him.

Clifford R. Youngstrom

Clifford Youngstrom covid-19

Clifford Russell Youngstrom passed away on May 15, 2020 in hospice care at St. Luke’s Hospital after a courageous battle with COVID-19. Due to restrictions, his loved ones were unable to be at his side, but they spoke continuously with him phone to let him know their love and support. He was 93 years old.

Clifford was born and raised in St. Louis. He proudly served in WWII and, as his obituary states:

In January 1944 he enlisted in the US Navy to fight in World War II. He shipped out to the Pacific and was assigned as 20mm gunner on the destroyer escort USS CROWLEY (DE303). His ship operated with the Third Fleet and went through the devastating “Typhoon Cobra” in December 1944. He later saw action at the battles of Leyte Gulf, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. At war’s end he witnessed the signing of the Japanese surrender, his ship moored in Tokyo Bay near USS MISSOURI

After the war, he volunteered to accompany test ships that were taken to be used in “Operation Crossroads” (Bikini Bomb Tests), and witnessed both nuclear detonations.

He married his wife after he got out of the military in 1947. They raised their family while he worked at the Aeronautical Chart and Information Center (ACIC). After raising their family, Cliff and his wife helped elderly members of their family during the last years of their lives.

Clifford Youngstrom is deeply missed by his wife of 72 years, his children, grandchildren, and his extended family.

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Alvin George Edgell – Humanitarian, WWII & Korean War veteran

Alvin George Edgell was enjoying his golden years in health at Alexian Brothers Landsdowne Village close to his family when he was struck with COVID-19, over 6 weeks after the nursing home locked down to visitors in an effort to prevent the novel coronavirus. Still very mentally sharp, he was using email to communicate until his last days. Al died on May 4th at the age of 96 with his son, a doctor at the hospital, by his side.

Al had a tremendously adventurous life, which is eloquently detailed in his obituary and public radio story linked in the sources below. A conscientious objector to WWII, his plea was rejected and he served as a medic in a non-combat role. He subsequently served in the Korean War. Al built his career around his passion, doing development work around the world.

In 1986 Al retired from Save The Children. When his wife retired they moved to St. Louis to be closer to their adult children and grandchildren. Al quickly became active in the St. Louis Ethical Society and gave speeches to other groups about world affairs. He published a memoir “Hindseeing: A Life in the World” under the pseudonym Bertram Clive Beardsley.

Alvin George Edgell is missed deeply by his wife of 50 years, his adult children, extended family, and everyone whose lives he touched.

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